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Category: Cover Letters

Reinforce your résumé with an effective referral

ReferralBy Robert Half International

 Job seekers know the power of networking in their search for employment. But it’s not just who you know; it’s also who your contacts know. An effective way to make the most of your connections is by asking for referrals.

 A referral is just one piece of the hiring puzzle, but it can support a well-crafted résumé and help your application rise to the top of the stack. It’s a recommendation made to a hiring manager, on your behalf, by someone who knows you both.

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Quiz: Is your cover letter like a bad handshake?

Susan Ricker, CareerBuilder Writer

 

A cover letter serves a specific purpose in the hiring process. While potential employers can turn to your résumé to see your work experience, a cover letter is an introduction to who you are and why the company should invite you in for an interview.

 Handshakes are another form of introduction, so think of your cover letter as handshake. While you may think you’re offering a warm handshake, your cover letter actually could be strong-arming you out of a job. Take this quiz to find out what type of handshake your cover letter is most associated with and the impression it’s giving to potential employers:

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Quiz: Is your cover letter like a bad handshake?

Susan Ricker, CareerBuilder Writer

 A cover letter serves a specific purpose in the hiring process. While potential employers can turn to your résumé to see your work experience, a cover letter is an introduction to who you are and why the company should invite you in for an interview.

 Handshakes are another form of introduction, so think of your cover letter as handshake. While you may think you’re offering a warm handshake, your cover letter actually could be strong-arming you out of a job. Take this quiz to find out what type of handshake your cover letter is most associated with and the impression it’s giving to potential employers:

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How to write a cover letter for a marketing position

If you’re a marketer promoting a product, you’d try to sell the customer on why the product is unique, why it meets a specific need and why it will make a short- and long-term difference in the customer’s life.

 If you’re seeking a marketing position, you should market yourself just like you would a product. While your résumé should include all the details about your experience and successes, you can use your cover letter to sell yourself and hook the hiring manager into reading your résumé.

 “In my opinion, cover letters are the ‘first impression’ for a potential recruit,” says Tracey Gould, director of marketing at architectural, engineering and interior design firm Baskervill. “This is the opportunity where a candidate should wow the potential employer with a summary of who they are and what they are passionate about in terms of marketing, display their successes in terms of qualitative and quantitative results, and demonstrate the value they, as an employee, would bring to the particular role and organization for which they are applying.”

 Here are tips on writing a cover letter for a marketing position:

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How to write a cover letter for a sales position

A cover letter is your first opportunity to impress a potential employer, and when you work in sales, you know how important a first impression can be.

 While the goal of a cover letter is to introduce yourself, explain why you’re a good fit for the position and express your interest in the company, a cover letter for a sales position will be more targeted. Are you unsure if your cover letter can close the deal? Read on for tips on what to include.

 Strut your sales statistics
If you’ve already held a sales position, this is your opportunity to show off your winning numbers. “Include your most important achievements: 1) sales success rate, expressed in numbers; 2) customers/clients retained and covered to new product areas; 3) new customers/clients gained; and 4) increase in profits [and] sales levels,” says Sandra Lamb, a career, lifestyle and etiquette expert. Being specific is more impactful than simply saying you were one of the best sales team members at your company.

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